Tag Archives: tomorrow never dies

David Arnold

David Arnold rose to worldwide recognition thanks to his rousing score for the box office smash hit “Independence Day”, though he was hardly an overnight success. His first work of note was for the 1993 film “The Young Americans”, which spawned the hit “Play Dead”. His next big break came from the release of “Stargate”, a 1994 box office hit. His collaboration with Dean Devlin and Roland Emmerich on their film “Stargate” led to his job scoring their next film “Independence Day”. That film would earn him a 1997 Grammy for “Best Instrumental Composition Written For A Motion Picture Or Television”.

In 1998 EastWest Records released “Shaken, Not Stirred: The David Arnold Collection”, a compilation album that featured remakes of some of the most beloved standards in the Bond musical legacy. He also scored the next Devlin/Emmerich production “Godzilla”, as well as the Freddie Prinze flick “Wing Commander”. In 1999 Arnold returned to Bond to score “The World Is Not Enough”. He is expected back for the next James Bond film.

Born: Luton, England

James Bond and The Golden Globes

1970 George Lazenby nominated Most Promising Male Newcomer for On Her Majesty`s Secret Service

1978 The Spy Who Loved Me nominated for Best Original Score
Marvin Hamlisch Nominated for Best Original Song “Nobody Does It Better”.

1985/86 Duran Duran and John Barry nominated for Best Original Song: “A View To A Kill”

1998 Sheryl Crow nominated for Best Song in “Tomorrow Never Dies”

James Bond and MTV… Entertainment Weekly… and more

Blockbuster Awards 1996 Pierce Brosnan nominated for Best Action Hero in “GoldenEye”

MTV Movie Awards 1995/96 Goldeneye nominated for Best Fight Sequence (Steam Room Scene) Nominated for BEST ACTION SEQUENCE : Motorcycle/helicopter chase, “Tomorrow Never Dies” (1998) Nominated for BEST FIGHT : Michelle Yeoh/bad guys, “Tomorrow Never Dies”(1998)

Entertainment Weekly Named Goldeneye as the Best Marketed film of 1995, saying the marketing dept. “made Bond seem like new”. Named Tomorrow Never Dies as one of the 5 Best Marketed Films of 1997.

The Razzies 1985/86 Tanya Roberts Nominated Worst Actress for her role as Stacy Sutton in “A View To A Kill” (she may have picked up a Golden Turkey award for the role as well)

Saturn Awards 1997/98 Pierce Brosnan wins Best Actor Award for James Bond in Tomorrow Never Dies.

Licensing Industry Merchandisers Association (LIMA) 1996 Winner for Goldeneye 1998 Winner for Tomorrow Never Dies

BAFTA In 1989 The British Academy of Film and Theater Arts awarded Cubby Broccoli the Lifetime Achievement Award for his contribution to the Bond series. The award was presented to Cubby by Timothy Dalton.

Tomorrow Never Dies Playstation

In development for Playstation. This game, being developed by Black Ops, is due to be released November 18th,1999. The game will be different from Goldeneye007 in that there will be much more variation in the type of action. Not just guns and explosions in this one. The game is viewed from the third person perspective, with Bond driving, skiing, flying and scuba diving. It`s less a remake of the film than it is a sequel. The plot deviates from the film by allegedly having Carver`s insane brother continuing with Elliot`s plan for world domination of the news market.

MGM Interactive decided that kind of game it wanted Tomorrow Never Dies to be was a game that recreated some of the best moments from all the Bond films. While Goldeneye007 has been universally praised for it`s goal of being more than just a shoot `em up, in essence it still is a “Doom” style game, albeit with more sophistication. Black Ops won`t just be using what it has created in the past for it`s other titles. No, instead, John Botti , CEO and President of Blacks Ops has promised that Tomorrow Never Dies will only incorporate about 30% of the currently existing technology that goes into it`s other games. thus making for one of the most technologically advanced, sophisticated and challenging Playstation games yet.

As previously mentioned, 007 will snow ski, SCUBA dive, fly, and fight enemies on foot like Goldeneye007. But he`ll aslo be able to eavesdrop on the conversations of other characters. The goal of Black Ops and Playstation are several: create a fresh, new 007 game that stands alone and apart from the movie and create a successful video game that will equal the sales of Goldeneye007, which was the hottest “toy” of the Christmas `97 buying season.

James Bond and Wai Lin Are Back!

In development for Playstation. This game, being developed by Black Ops, is due to be released November 16th,1999. The game will be different from Goldeneye007 in that there will be much more variation in the type of action. Not just guns and explosions in this one. The game is viewed from the third person perspective, with Bond driving, skiing, flying and scuba diving. It`s less a remake of the film than it is a sequel. The plot deviates from the film by allegedly having Carver`s insane brother continuing with Elliot`s plan for world domination of the news market.

MGM Interactive decided that kind of game it wanted Tomorrow Never Dies to be was a game that recreated some of the best moments from all the Bond films. While Goldeneye007 has been universally praised for it`s goal of being more than just a shoot `em up, in essence it still is a “Doom” style game, albeit with more sophistication. Black Ops won`t just be using what it has created in the past for it`s other titles. No, instead, John Botti , CEO and President of Blacks Ops has promised that Tomorrow Never Dies will only incorporate about 30% of the currently existing technology that goes into it`s other games. thus making for one of the most technologically advanced, sophisticated and challenging Playstation games yet.

As previously mentioned, 007 will snow ski, SCUBA dive, fly, and fight enemies on foot like Goldeneye007. But he`ll aslo be able to eavesdrop on the conversations of other characters. The goal of Black Ops and Playstation are several: create a fresh, new 007 game that stands alone and apart from the movie and create a successful video game that will equal the sales of Goldeneye007, which was the hottest “toy” of the Christmas `97 buying season.

In addition to playing Bond, gamers can also portray Bond Girl Wai Lin. Published by Electronic Arts, Tomorrow Never Dies is developed for PlayStation and will be available November 16. This title is rated T (for teens ages 13+). ($50)

Tomorrow Never Dies Score: Part Two

There will be a companion CD soundtrack, Tomorrow Never Dies: The Original Score to the Video Game, available later this month from Chapter III Records.

The CD will consist of a total of 17 different Bond-themed “electronica“ tracks, all of which are original Tommy Tallarico scores from the game. Tallarico is a game industry veteran best known for compiling video game soundtracks. The CD will be available for direct purchase via the product web site at www.bondmusic.com, followed by retail outlets starting on January 12, 2000.

The website for Tommy Tallarico is www.tallarico.com. Sonic Mayhem also helped Tallarico score the music to the game. Their website can be found at www.sonicmayhem.com.

Mr. Boer, Meet Mr. Brosnan

…”My name is Boer…James Boer.” I’m Dutch, and my middle name is Jacobus (“James”). I’ve handed Pierce Brosnan the story excerpted here . . . Think my biggest hero is James Bond? It’s the Lord Jesus Christ!

Before you leave this BondFanEvents page thinking I’m a Jesus freak, I encourage you to read a bit longer! Or as Q says, “Now pay attention, 007!” The reason I love Christ above our friend James is that Christ paid for my sin!

The Bible says all of us are sinners, breaking God’s law in actions, words and thoughts. Even 007, though sarcastic, agrees with this in For Your Eyes Only, saying to Q, “Forgive me father, for I have sinned.” Our sin and guilt separate us from God. To go to heaven, however, we must be perfect. We can never go to heaven on our merits.

God loves us, though, and wants us to be with Him in heaven eternally. God sent His Son, Jesus Christ, to earth to take our sin. Christ went to the cross and paid for sin there, taking punishment we deserve. After, He rose from the dead proving He had paid for sin. All He asks us to do in response is to place our trust in what He has done, not trusting our merits to get to heaven but what He did. The Bible says that:

“…God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever trusts in Him, will not perish, but have eternal life.”

It’s simple, God loves me, but I have sinned. Jesus paid for my sin and if I trust Him, I am assured of heaven! I know for certain I have eternal life and my sin is forgiven! I have a purpose to live for, to tell others what Christ did for me! “It’s a new world…with new dangers…but you can still depend on one man…Jesus Christ!”

—Kees Boer has been with 007Forever.com’s Bond Weekends since they were a fevered dream of a few crazy folk.

Tomorrow Never Dies (Novelization)

Movie novelizations are notoriously bad, as the action is badly translated from the silver screen to the printed page. Thankfully, Raymond Benson`s adaptation of the 18th Bond movie, Tomorrow Never Dies, is an exception. Far from being a direct copy of what was seen in the cinema, the novel nevertheless remains faithful to Roger Spottiswoode`s film.

Just as a chef perfects a familiar recipe Benson had tweaked the plot of Tomorrow Never Dies to produce an original and compelling read. Without budgetary or time restraints, time is given to character development and background. We learn of Carver`s rise to power and the seeds of his madness, while Wai-Lin`s mission is given some much-needed back-story, which only strengthens the already impressive character.

The central theme of media manipulation is also examined in more detail than was seen on screen, with nice touches such as M leaking misinformation to the British press to ensure her position at MI6 is secure, adding a feeling of realism to the snowballing world crises.

One of the biggest changes is the character of Paris, now a far-more independent character ready to leave her husband at the drop of a hat – or dress – and willing to wear her involvement with 007 on her sleeve. Unfortunately, without the entrapment of a marriage impossible to escape, Paris loses her desperation and sympathy this making her death less of a tragedy.

While Tomorrow Never Dies fails to touch Zero Minus Ten`s crown, the novel stands head and shoulders above the usual tie-in pap and successful captures the excitement of one of the best Bond films in the canon.

The Making of Tomorrow Never Dies

The “Making of” Tomorrow Never Dies books currently chronicling the making of films are notoriously bad. Packed with overlarge pictures, and consisting largely of an extended synopsis of the movie at hand, they usually aren`t worth the paper that they are printed on. Thankfully, Garth Pearce`s The Making of Tomorrow Never Dies is different.

The inevitable plot spoiler is mercifully short and while there are plenty of large pictures the sheer quality of the text balances this out. As with his earlier tome regarding GoldenEye, Pearce is eager to show every aspect of creating a film rather than merely focusing on interviews with the stars. By all accounts, the eighteenth Bond movie has involved more stress and anxiety than any of 007`s earlier adventures. From unbelievably strict deadlines to tensions between writers, the director and the cast, Pearce doesn`t pull any punches, telling the tales warts and all.

The detail is staggering, with in-depth examinations of the background work that has gone into the film`s many stunts and eye-witness accounts of the toils and joys of day to day filming. Once again these are not only limited to the likes of Brosnan, Hatcher or Pryce. The inclusion of a lengthy interview with Juliette Hendon, one of the hundreds of extras in the film, is a testimony to the author`s credibility and completism.

With only a few minor errors which will annoy aficionados of the Bond franchise – such as the suggestion that Teri Hatcher is the only character other than Bond himself to ever deliver the `shaken not stirred` line – The Making of Tomorrow Never Dies truly lives up to the cliché of being an essential part of any fan`s collection. Those who haven`t seen the film will be swept up in the excitement and drama of its origins which will only heighten their anticipation while those who have will be able to dig beneath the surface of the biggest 007 film to date.

Spain, Vietnam and China – bond movie locations

Spain: Was once an original location shoot for Tomorrow Never Dies but was scrapped just prior to filming. The film was behind schedule and this may have been the reason. Spain and the Guggenheim made it back into the next film, The World Is Not Enough.

Vietnam: The producers wanted to actually film the relevant scenes of Tomorrow Never Dies in Vietnam where part of the film is set. Apparently the Communist factions of either China or Vietnam didn`t approve and took away Bond`s permit to film there. Thailand was then used as a substitute. EON will tell you though that they backed out of Vietnam, not the other way around. Why China would crush this production is a mystery, since the script is very complementary of them. Speaking of China…

China: Was one of the original locations for Licence To Kill. Locations had been scouted as early as December of 1987 in preparation for a summer 1988 filming date. What happened to the China angle? The primary reason is that EON wanted to be the first major Western film production to use China as a backdrop. “Empire Of The Sun” beat them to it. And it would`ve been more expensive to film in China as well and EON found a good place to film with Cherubusco Studios in Mexico City.

tomorrow never changes?

The Tomorrow Never Dies novel by Raymond Benson follows the plot lines closely of the final film. Author Benson wrote his book from an early script provided to him by EON. For purposes of rushing the book to coincide with the film’s release, (publishers need the books completed months ahead) authors typically write from first script drafts—even if the film hasn’t wrapped shooting and changes the final result!

Mr. Benson has himself stated that Tomorrow Never Dies and his forthcoming The World Is Not Enough are not among his favorite efforts because they were done at speed to satisfy the fans. First printings of the British hardback of TND, however, are fetching nearly $200 US, due to their selling out from bookstores in a matter of days after its release.

Which juicy tidbits make it to the book that are not on celluloid? Intriguing lines of Bruce Feirstein’s scripted dialogue and character backgrounds, mostly.

Villains:

Intriguingly, Raymond Benson’s Stamper was genetically engineered to be without nerve endings! In effect, he can “feel no pain,” a skill numerous moviegoers might envy. In the film Stamper’s invulnerability is nearly unexplored—watch when he smiles as Bond’s knife finds a target in his leg. Stamper apparently enjoys snuff video, and possibly pornography also, for his lighter TV watching. In the final film, his crew on Carver’s “Stealth Ship” videotapes the gunning down of Devonshire survivors. This plot element is not played to any effect greater than a quick, greedy glance between Carver and Stamper, who share a taste for sensational video in the novel.

Allies:

In the novel, MI6 Chief of Staff, Bill Tanner, appears from the beginning, but in the film this longtime ally has been replaced by “Get out of it, James!” Robinson.

After escaping from the Khyber Pass alive, Bond (White Knight) sends a message to the haughty Admiral Roebuck, code named Black King: “…you can tell the Black King that the White Knight would like to shove the whole chessboard right up his bishop!” In the final film, this provocative line has been replaced with the terse: “Ask the Admiral where he’d like these (bombs) delivered.”

The exotic Wai Lin has a background mission that hastens her visit to Elliot Carver’s Hamburg headquarters. She receives orders from a “General Koh” to investigate “General Chang.” The film has pitched Wai Lin’s assignment from her superiors, and a silent General Chang is glimpsed once by Wai Lin and Bond.

Wai Lin and 007 make hanky-panky before boarding the Stealth Ship and again after its destruction. In the film, we are teased with an embrace as the final credits roll.

Both 007 and Wai Lin pose as bankers, while in the film Wai Lin’s television reporter cover earns a few risqué laughs from Carver when he threatens to “get Miss Lin behind a news desk.”

In the book, Paris is “introduced” to James Bond by her hubby, Elliot Carver. She promptly slaps Bond silly and rushes Wai Lin into a powder room to gossip about him! In the film, of course, Bond stalks up behind Paris, alone, and quips “I’ve always wondered how I’d feel if I ever saw you again.” This line comes from their hotel room scene in the novel.

sela ward

In  interviews that the then-41-year-old SISTERS star has done to promote her new ABC show, ONCE AND AGAIN, she revealed that she tried out for the role of Paris Carver in TOMORROW NEVER DIES. While she didn`t name the director, she was obviously talking about Roger Spottiswoode when she said, “The director told me they wanted the Sela Ward of 10 years ago.” In other words, they considered her to be too old. This is interesting. After United Artists cancelled any plans to cast a European actress in the role of Paris, they looked to Sela Ward before they settled on Teri Hatcher, who was younger and certainly more popular among males.

Sela was an established film and television star before trying out for the role of Paris Carver. She won critical acclaim for her portrayal of newsreporter Jessia Savitch in the Lifetime film: ALMOST GOLDEN: THE JESSICA SAVITCH STORY as well as the doomed wife of Harrison Ford in the 1993 blockbuster film THE FUGITIVE. After failing to get the role in TOMORROW NEVER DIES, she starred opposite Mike Myers, Ryan Phillipe and Salma Hayek in 54, the true life account of the infamous 1970`s New York disco that was a mecca for drugs, sex and dance music.

Tomorrow Never Dies: Julia Bremermann

The star of the British drama Space Island One was rumored to be in the running for Elliot Harmsway`s (last name later changed to Carver) wife in Tomorrow Never Dies. A member of Bondklub Deutschland (German Bond Club) spoke with Bremermann`s agency in Hamburg and they confirmed that she had a casting session for TND.

As a result Roger Spottiswoode wanted her to portray Elliot Harmsway`s German wife, a former serious love affair of Bond. But Spottiswoode wasn`t allowed to give her a contract when the producers and MGM/UA said Bremermann would be one German element too much (as they already had Hamburg as a location and Götz Otto as a henchman and BMW as Bond`s car). So she didn`t get the job and Spottiswoode was told to accept Teri Hatcher, which caused a lot of trouble between the director and the producers.

Pulp and Bon jovi

Pulp submitted a song to the producers for consideration for Bond 18 (later officially titled Tomorrow Never Dies). The song, like so many others, was “rejected”. But Pulp, being big Bond fans, were undeterred. They simply retitled the song “Tomorrow Never Lies” (which was incidentally the original title of the film until a typing error) and released it on their latest album.

Jon Bon Jovi was asked to submit a song for Bond 18, either by the producers or by David Arnold. Whether he did or not is unknown.