Tag Archives: the world is not enough

Mr. Boer, Meet Mr. Brosnan

…”My name is Boer…James Boer.” I’m Dutch, and my middle name is Jacobus (“James”). I’ve handed Pierce Brosnan the story excerpted here . . . Think my biggest hero is James Bond? It’s the Lord Jesus Christ!

Before you leave this BondFanEvents page thinking I’m a Jesus freak, I encourage you to read a bit longer! Or as Q says, “Now pay attention, 007!” The reason I love Christ above our friend James is that Christ paid for my sin!

The Bible says all of us are sinners, breaking God’s law in actions, words and thoughts. Even 007, though sarcastic, agrees with this in For Your Eyes Only, saying to Q, “Forgive me father, for I have sinned.” Our sin and guilt separate us from God. To go to heaven, however, we must be perfect. We can never go to heaven on our merits.

God loves us, though, and wants us to be with Him in heaven eternally. God sent His Son, Jesus Christ, to earth to take our sin. Christ went to the cross and paid for sin there, taking punishment we deserve. After, He rose from the dead proving He had paid for sin. All He asks us to do in response is to place our trust in what He has done, not trusting our merits to get to heaven but what He did. The Bible says that:

“…God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever trusts in Him, will not perish, but have eternal life.”

It’s simple, God loves me, but I have sinned. Jesus paid for my sin and if I trust Him, I am assured of heaven! I know for certain I have eternal life and my sin is forgiven! I have a purpose to live for, to tell others what Christ did for me! “It’s a new world…with new dangers…but you can still depend on one man…Jesus Christ!”

—Kees Boer has been with 007Forever.com’s Bond Weekends since they were a fevered dream of a few crazy folk.

The World Is Not Enough (Novelization)

Raymond Benson’s novelization of The World Is Not Enough screenplay reads “fast and loose,” but of necessity, the book follows the screenplay so closely that fans will have to dig in with grit to unearth the fans’ treasures hidden inside.

By Mr. Benson’s own admission, he was rushed by Hodder & Staughton’s publishing schedule combined with a fast post-production on the TWINE final film, to do very much of anything exotic or innovative with the book. Raymond Benson’s knowledge of the James Bond phenomenon is encyclopedic in nature, however, and besides being a leading Bond writer, he is a fan’s fan who can recall chapter and verse of any significant Bond novel section, and he adds spicy details to his 007 movie novels.

Tidbits of Flemingiana are scattered throughout the TWINE novel, as when Bond savors the “scent and smell and sweat” of Valentin Zhukovsky’s casino (confer with Chapter 1 of “Casino Royale”). There are fun pokes at the Purvis/Wade/Feirstein scripts of recent years, shared lovingly, like when M admonishes Bond that “Contrary to what you may believe, Double-O Seven, the world is not populated by madmen who can hollow out volcanoes, fill them with big breasted women, and threaten the world with nuclear annihilation . . . ” (!) from a rejected Bruce Feirstein script bit. Benson adds his response, “Bond grinned at the irony of her remark . . . “. Bond ducks into the Bilbao, Spain art museum for a wistful look at great works after leaping from a window away from a sniper, in another place. We get fun and Fleming-like travelogue, weapons and vehicle details throughout.

Another help for any avid Bond movie fan Mr. Benson provides is his thorough covering over of some of the final film’s weightier continuity errors in his work, a pleasant tradition dating back to the first Bond novelization for “The Spy Who Loved Me”. How does Bond’s small craft leap up to destroy “Giuliana’s” gun placement on her boat? (Bond uses her craft as a launch ramp.) Why do all four of the dreaded parahawks chase down Bond instead of at least half targeting Elektra King on the slopes, to make Renard’s “attack” on her look valid? (Two hawks indeed chase King in the novel, until she is “frightened” enough to turn tail and head conveniently in Bond’s direction.) Bar bets and newsgroup disputes on TWINE continuity errors should be checked here first. Mr. Benson is thoroughly meticulous in making Bond’s world dovetail with our real world where possible.

Best of all the goodies, a delightfully Fleming-ish chapter late in the book explores in detail Renard’s history as a terrorist/Bond villain. Benson’s yarn of villain Renard and his “affair” with Elektra King receive treatment from Benson at a clever spot in the narrative, and makes this book worth a read by itself. Thanks, Raymond!

In sum, “The World Is Not Enough” movie novel gives readers a quick taste of Bond while they await Benson’s forthcoming novel, “Doubleshot”. Plus in its first printing British hardcover, The World Is Not Enough from Hodder & Staughton, is fetching US $75 to $150 for its scarcity only two months after publication! (Rumor has it Hodder ran merely 2,250 copies of the first printing state, with many copies gone to libraries immediately.) Oh Hodder, when will you promote your Bond novels like you did years ago, when John Gardner standees and fancy displays headlined “License Renewed” and every Bond novel hit the NY Times list?

–Matt Sherman collects all the British Bond firsts and many more hot collectibles with you at 007Forever Collectors’ Corner.

Roulette, Mister Bond?

American and European versions of roulette use the same rules. The difference between the two versions is that the American machines have a zero and double zero for 38 compartments, and the European machines have only the single zero for 37 compartments.

Each player is given his own colored set of chips (except in France, where some problems arise since all players use the same colored chips). The chips have no face value; each player tells the croupier the value of his chips when he purchases them. The croupier keeps track of the value of each set of chips by putting a small check chip with this value on the stack of chips.

Half the 36 numbers for the compartments are red and the others black. The zero and double zero are neutral colors (usually green).

The croupier asks the players to place their bets. A player does not have to sit at the table to place a bet. Once all bets are down, the croupier spins the wheel clockwise and then flips the ball counterclockwise around the rim of the wheel. Eventually, the ball lands in one of the compartments and the bets are paid off.

The simplest bet is to place chips on a single number. This is betting Straight Up (Plein); if the ball lands in this numbered compartment, the player is paid off at a ratio of 35 to 1.

Chips can be placed to cover several numbers at once. The diagrams on this page show the American and European roulette tables. The chip marked A touches “14” and “17”; this is called Split Numbers (Cheval). If either of these numbers wins, the player is paid off at a ratio of17 to 1. The chip marked B is placed on the corners of 26, 27, 29 and 30; this is called a Corner (Carre) and pays off at 8 to 1.

A Trio (Traversale Plein) bet is on the three numbers in a particular row (chip C in the diagram is betting on 28, 29, and 30); this bet pays off at 11 to 1. On the American version only, a Five Numbers bet can be made (chip D in the diagram covers 0, 00, 1 ,2, and 3); this bet pays off at 6 to 1. A Six Numbers (Traversale Simple) bet covers two rows (chip E in the diagram covers 10, 11, 12 , 13, 14, and 15); this bet pays off at 5 to 1.

A Column Bet (Colonne) covers 12 numbers (chip F in the diagram) in a column, and pays off at 2 to 1. The European tables allow a Split Column (Colonne a Cheval) that covers two columns (24 numbers); it pays off at 1 to 2. A Dozen (Douzaine) bet covers 12 numbers (chip G in the diagram covers 1 through 12); it pays off at 2 to 1. The European tables allow a Split Double (Douzaine a Cheval) where a chip covers 24 numbers; this bet pays off at 1 to 2.

Players can make Even Chance (Chances Simples) bets where the number that will come up will be red (Rouge) or black (Noir), odd (Impair), or even (Pair) or low (Manque; low numbers 1 to 18) or high (passe; high numbers 19 to 36.) These bets pay off even money.

In the American version, if the number that comes up is a 0 or 00, only single bets made on those numbers win. All Even Chance bets are lost in this case. In the European version, a 0 means the croupier “imprisons” the chips (that is, the chips stay on that bet until the next roll) but the chips lose half their value.

Spain, Vietnam and China – bond movie locations

Spain: Was once an original location shoot for Tomorrow Never Dies but was scrapped just prior to filming. The film was behind schedule and this may have been the reason. Spain and the Guggenheim made it back into the next film, The World Is Not Enough.

Vietnam: The producers wanted to actually film the relevant scenes of Tomorrow Never Dies in Vietnam where part of the film is set. Apparently the Communist factions of either China or Vietnam didn`t approve and took away Bond`s permit to film there. Thailand was then used as a substitute. EON will tell you though that they backed out of Vietnam, not the other way around. Why China would crush this production is a mystery, since the script is very complementary of them. Speaking of China…

China: Was one of the original locations for Licence To Kill. Locations had been scouted as early as December of 1987 in preparation for a summer 1988 filming date. What happened to the China angle? The primary reason is that EON wanted to be the first major Western film production to use China as a backdrop. “Empire Of The Sun” beat them to it. And it would`ve been more expensive to film in China as well and EON found a good place to film with Cherubusco Studios in Mexico City.

The World Is Not Enough: Monica Belluci and Milla Jovovich

Belluci would have played Paris Carver in Tomorrow Never Dies had she gotten the chance. She screen tested for the part, and impressed Pierce Brosnan enough to be his choice. But executives at EON wanted a “name actress” so they hired Teri Hatcher instead (see also Tomorrow Never Dies: Julia Bremermann for more on this subject). She may have been the number two choice on a short list of actresses to play the role but Roger Spottiswoode was quite high on having her play the part, and yet overruled by the studio.

She was born September 30th, 1968 in Perugia, Italy. In 1988 she began studying law but dropped her studies a year later to move to Milan to become a model. She`s appeared in the 1992 Francis Ford Coppola film “Dracula”, and has been nominated for a Cesar as The Most Promising Actress 1996. Her name may have come back up for consideration when the role of Elektra was in the early stages of being cast. As casting narrowed down to a conclusion, European news sources at the time indicated the role was down to two actresses: Milla Jovovich and Sophie Marceau. Sophie Marceau, the older actress, and older looking and far more experienced actress, got the part.

javier bardem – an early look

When Oscar nominations were announced on Tuesday, February 13th, 2001, an audible gasp and a thunderous round of applause went out when the name of Javier Bardem was called. The actor, nominated for “Before Night Falls”, was considered a long-shot to get a nomination for a film that, as a whole, had not generated much Oscar-buzz.

Bardem was to soon become a household name around the world (and was already a big star in Spain), but had he accepted the offer to play Renard in THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH, he may have become even more famous much sooner. In the February 23rd, 2001 issue of Entertainment Weekly, Bardem tells the reporter Steve Daly why he turned down Renard: “With all my respects….that is not the kind of thing I like to do. I want to be on risk. Otherwise this job has not a meaning.”

His English still needed work and perhaps that`s the real reason he didn`t play Renard.

ginger spice? Liz Hurley?

Better known as “Ginger Spice” of The Spice Girls, Geri met with The World Is Not Enough director Michael Apted for the role of Dr. Christmas Jones. She didn`t get it. Her only explanation was that “things just didn`t work out”.

Elizabeth Hurley, world supermodel and girlfriend of Hugh Grant, an actress in her own right, was rumored to have been approached for a role in GoldenEye and ever since. She didn`t do anything in the film, but she did present a 45 minute tribute to the Bond series that aired on FOX-TV in the United States later in 1995.