Tag Archives: James Bond 007: The Duel

James Bond 007: The Duel

You`re no longer just watching Bond. You are Bond – jumping into fast and furious action on your TV screen! And so begins the classic Sega Genesis Bond adventure, originally released in 1992! James Bond 007: The Duel, pits you against your worst enemy, a mad professor with the power to clone your past villains! What`s worse, this villain is planning to take over the world from his secret Caribbean island base.

This is where you come in. As Timothy Dalton`s 007, you pit yourself against five increasingly difficult levels in an effort to stop world domination. You`ll have your trustworthy PPK, as well as the occasional hand grenade, to carve your way through the Professor`s guards, and OddJob and Jaws! The game plays in the classic Genesis side-scrolling environment. You run, gun, and jump your way to victory, working towards your final confrontation inside a boiling volcano. Along the way, you`ll rescue several female hostages, all giving a gracious yelp when you save them.

This game is extremely difficult, making Goldeneye look like a game of solitaire. It`s not a matter of control (you can shoot in every direction), the bad guys are just really good! You face Jaws in the first level, and while he`s not difficult, it`s a big jolt to see his steel teeth in your face! The game supports one player, with MIDI music used thoroughly. The graphics are pretty standard, however I thought the ship level was outstanding. The game uses innovative features such as hand-over-hand climbing, full directional shooting, and ducking, which weren`t featured in a lot of games until around 1995.

The price of this game was $38.96 when it originally was released. However, I picked up a copy for $15.00, and I`m sure you could find one for even less. While this game wasn`t a real hot seller, it still manages to capture 00-Flair for a 16-bit gamer. This is a great game for a rainy Saturday afternoon, just haul out your dusty Sega and have some friends over for some 007 action!

Review by Ben Zimmerman