Fleming’s Real Life Spy’s Passport

BOND CREATOR FLEMING`S SPY PASSPORT NETS $25,000
LONDON (Reuters) – A passport that James Bond creator Ian Fleming used in a real-life wartime spy mission fetched $24,850 at auction Thursday, more than five times the estimate, Sotheby`s said.

Fleming used the passport during a secret World War II operation, code named “Goldeneye,“ to ensure that communications between London and Gibraltar would remain open if Spain had taken Germany`s side. Fleming`s role was to set up the “Goldeneye“ office in the British colony at the mouth of the Mediterranean Sea and persuade the United States to collaborate in the mission.

The passport — stamped “Valid for a journey to Gibraltar and return“ on Feb. 16, 1941– had been expected to fetch between $3,000-$4,800, Sotheby`s said. Fleming, whose novels about the suave, fictitious secret agent inspired the blockbuster film series, named his house in Jamaica “Goldeneye“ — also the title of a 1995 Bond screen adventure starring Pierce Brosnan as agent 007.

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